https://cdn.mtdcnc.global/cnc/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/10144210/48-49-SAC189-ST-Preparing-for-the-next-black-swan-event-2-640x360.jpg
    Tooling

    Preparing for the next black swan event

    • By Sandvik Coromant
    • November 22, 2020
    • 4 minute read

    Turning is an exact science that requires subtle process variations to achieve results. But we live in far from exact times, and analysts predict that industry must prepare for a ‘new normal’ created by COVID-19. Here, Rolf Olofsson, product manager at Sandvik Coromant, explains how turning should differ according to the material to help manufacturers embrace the uncertain times ahead.

    It’s fair to say that with COVID-19, industry has experienced a ‘black swan event’ — a term for a significant unpredictable incident. Manufacturers could face two scenarios in the new normal era. Some industries have faced high demand scenarios, such as food production and pharmaceuticals and in these cases, solutions are needed to increase metal removal rates and support quick changeovers. Other manufacturers have faced low demand scenarios. These require more pieces per edge while providing process security with fewer interruptions. In either case, the key to profitable steel turning lies in having the best setup from the machine to the cutting edge.

    In its recent COVID-19: Briefing note, analyst McKinsey & Company describes the upcoming climate for manufacturers as the ‘next to normal’ where manufacturers can expect unpredictable and lasting market shifts. The report says that resilience will be needed to navigate an economically and socially viable path. Elsewhere, Pricewaterhouse Coopers’ (PwC) ‘COVID-19: What it means for industrial manufacturing report’ recommends companies expand into new industries and revenue streams. This is either forced by defunct markets or spotting an opportunity.

    Production flexibility

    But, what does flexibility mean for batch manufacturers? It comprises several factors, including fast changeovers, optimised or reduced inventory and minimising production stops.

    To deliver flexibility, the choice of steel turning solutions will be vital to realise new levels of efficiency. At present, most recognise the importance of the selected grade of insert. However, many do not realise that considering the whole tooling concept from insert grade, tool holder and clamping can increase output and reduce costs. This must also apply when working with tough materials that Sandvik Coromant customers ask for advice about. They include the ISO P sub material groups, including unalloyed steel and low alloyed steel, for which GC4415 and GC4425 are particularly relevant. Understanding material differences is essential.

    The goals are simple, metals in the ISO P group are not. ISO P metals exhibit multiple properties that can be difficult to manage. In contrast, if machining HRSA in the S group, we would probably encounter low thermal conductivity, which results in heat concentration in the cutting zone that can deform tools. This single property is easy to counter, but the multiple properties of an ISO P material can be more challenging. What if the material combines adhesion properties of low alloy steel with unusual thermal conductivity, as described in Best Practice Guidelines for Structural Fire Resistance Design of Concrete and Steel Buildings, by the materials specialist Therese McAllister? A single tool can’t always counter both properties, without excessive wear.

    Profitable, flexible steel turning

    Sandvik Coromant has devoted a huge amount of R&D to address these challenges. As a result, it is launching a pair of new P-turning carbide grades, the GC4415 and GC4425. The work at Sandvik Coromant has revolved around our second-generation Inveio® technology. First-generation Inveio was the technical breakthrough of using uni-directional crystal orientation in the alumina coating to increase wear resistance and tool life. In our second-generation, we have improved crystal orientation further for greater wear resistance and consistency. We are working with second-generation partners using our new P turning carbide grades for external and internal machining, from finishing to roughing with continuous cuts and light interruptions.

    This was tested by a customer in the general engineering industry, using the GC4425 carbide insert to manufacture pressure rollers. GC4425 is designed for improved wear resistance, heat resistance and toughness while running at higher cutting data. Used on an ISO-P material, a designation applied to unalloyed to high-alloyed grades that are difficult to machine, with a normal-to-average hardness of 205HB, the workpiece was subjected to continuous external axial turning and semi-finishing. The cutting speed (vc) was 200m/min, feed rate (fn) 0.4 mm/rev with a depth (ap) of 4.0 mm. A competitor had a tool life of just 12 pieces before wearing out due to plastic deformation whereas the GC4425 lasted 50% longer with predictable wear.

    We do not know what the new post-pandemic normal will be. But we understand customers objectives and the exact science of metal cutting. By combining those insights, it is possible to support profitable steel turning in the future.

    https://cdn.mtdcnc.global/cnc/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/10144210/48-49-SAC189-ST-Preparing-for-the-next-black-swan-event-2-640x360.jpg

    Preparing for the next black swan event

    Turning is an exact science that requires subtle process variations to achieve results. But we live in far from exact times, and analysts predict that industry must prepare for a ‘new normal’ created by COVID-19. Here, Rolf Olofsson, product manager at Sandvik Coromant, explains how turning should differ according to the material to help manufacturers embrace the uncertain times ahead.

    It’s fair to say that with COVID-19, industry has experienced a ‘black swan event’ — a term for a significant unpredictable incident. Manufacturers could face two scenarios in the new normal era. Some industries have faced high demand scenarios, such as food production and pharmaceuticals and in these cases, solutions are needed to increase metal removal rates and support quick changeovers. Other manufacturers have faced low demand scenarios. These require more pieces per edge while providing process security with fewer interruptions. In either case, the key to profitable steel turning lies in having the best setup from the machine to the cutting edge.

    In its recent COVID-19: Briefing note, analyst McKinsey & Company describes the upcoming climate for manufacturers as the ‘next to normal’ where manufacturers can expect unpredictable and lasting market shifts. The report says that resilience will be needed to navigate an economically and socially viable path. Elsewhere, Pricewaterhouse Coopers’ (PwC) ‘COVID-19: What it means for industrial manufacturing report’ recommends companies expand into new industries and revenue streams. This is either forced by defunct markets or spotting an opportunity.

    Production flexibility

    But, what does flexibility mean for batch manufacturers? It comprises several factors, including fast changeovers, optimised or reduced inventory and minimising production stops.

    To deliver flexibility, the choice of steel turning solutions will be vital to realise new levels of efficiency. At present, most recognise the importance of the selected grade of insert. However, many do not realise that considering the whole tooling concept from insert grade, tool holder and clamping can increase output and reduce costs. This must also apply when working with tough materials that Sandvik Coromant customers ask for advice about. They include the ISO P sub material groups, including unalloyed steel and low alloyed steel, for which GC4415 and GC4425 are particularly relevant. Understanding material differences is essential.

    The goals are simple, metals in the ISO P group are not. ISO P metals exhibit multiple properties that can be difficult to manage. In contrast, if machining HRSA in the S group, we would probably encounter low thermal conductivity, which results in heat concentration in the cutting zone that can deform tools. This single property is easy to counter, but the multiple properties of an ISO P material can be more challenging. What if the material combines adhesion properties of low alloy steel with unusual thermal conductivity, as described in Best Practice Guidelines for Structural Fire Resistance Design of Concrete and Steel Buildings, by the materials specialist Therese McAllister? A single tool can’t always counter both properties, without excessive wear.

    Profitable, flexible steel turning

    Sandvik Coromant has devoted a huge amount of R&D to address these challenges. As a result, it is launching a pair of new P-turning carbide grades, the GC4415 and GC4425. The work at Sandvik Coromant has revolved around our second-generation Inveio® technology. First-generation Inveio was the technical breakthrough of using uni-directional crystal orientation in the alumina coating to increase wear resistance and tool life. In our second-generation, we have improved crystal orientation further for greater wear resistance and consistency. We are working with second-generation partners using our new P turning carbide grades for external and internal machining, from finishing to roughing with continuous cuts and light interruptions.

    This was tested by a customer in the general engineering industry, using the GC4425 carbide insert to manufacture pressure rollers. GC4425 is designed for improved wear resistance, heat resistance and toughness while running at higher cutting data. Used on an ISO-P material, a designation applied to unalloyed to high-alloyed grades that are difficult to machine, with a normal-to-average hardness of 205HB, the workpiece was subjected to continuous external axial turning and semi-finishing. The cutting speed (vc) was 200m/min, feed rate (fn) 0.4 mm/rev with a depth (ap) of 4.0 mm. A competitor had a tool life of just 12 pieces before wearing out due to plastic deformation whereas the GC4425 lasted 50% longer with predictable wear.

    We do not know what the new post-pandemic normal will be. But we understand customers objectives and the exact science of metal cutting. By combining those insights, it is possible to support profitable steel turning in the future.