https://cdn.mtdcnc.global/cnc/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/08120234/Photo-19-04-2021-13-56-29-1-640x360.jpg
    Machining

    Aero subcontractor flies high with new Correa

    • By MTDCNC
    • July 13, 2021
    • 4 minute read

    Stockport subcontract manufacturer Manufax Engineering Ltd has just bought its ninth Correa machine from DTS UK Machine Tools in Chorley. MTDCNC travelled to the town on the outskirts of Manchester to find out more.

    Over the last 60 years, Manufax Engineering Ltd has established a reputation for supplying a precision engineering service to the aerospace, nuclear, automotive, space and agricultural industries.

    The company supplies tooling jigs and fixtures to industry OEMs such as Airbus, BAE Systems, Rolls Royce Aero Engines, Rolls Royce Submarines, United Technology Corporation, Bombardier and many more. The offering also encompasses specialist tooling design and manufacture across disciplines such as airframe assembly jigs and fixtures, airframe detail tooling, mould tooling, automotive tooling and components for the nuclear sector.

    Highlighting why the new Axia machine from Correa was acquired, David Baines from Manufax says: “This machine is for us to take on the heavier side of things – large workpieces. We have an 8m capacity on this machine and before this, our next largest capacity machine is 5m. As things keep progressing, we have to meet the needs of our clients and what they ask of us.”

    With such a solid machine construction, Manufax had to build foundations under the machine. Alluding to this, David informs MTDCNC: “There is a huge foundation in here. It is very deep with a lot of concrete in there and it took over three months to put the machine in. With a machine column that moves from left to right, we are not moving heavy parts. We just clamp the parts on the table and away we go, this means there is no restriction on the size and weight of the job we can work with.”

    Looking at the parts the company is machining on its new investment, David says: “We put all types of work through this machine. We have fabrications that come through here, we are also doing a lot of mould tools at the moment for both aerospace and military purposes. One specific job that we have done on the machine is a drill tool for one of our blue-chip customers in the aerospace sector, it started as an aluminium billet that was over 15 inches thick and it has been machined to 1.5 inches and it is contoured. When we were cutting the part on the machine, it was like it was snowing. There was material all over the place and it performed absolutely beautifully.”

    Discussing the ‘box in box’ construction that provides exceptional stability and rigidity, David says: “When we were looking at this new machine, we had a lot of machines that we were considering. We selected this machine because of the ‘box in box’ construction where you have the RAM inside a box which is on the column that is inside in the box. This means that we can take heavy cuts in both directions, and it is not drooping off the column. This is impressive because some RAM machines are only powerful when they are pushing against the column in a single direction. When the RAM is extended the machine also has droop compensation and also wedges that lock into position to enhance rigidity.”

    Looking at the tool change facility and the overall flexibility of the machine, David continues: “We can run this machine unmanned when we have long cutting cycles. We can put multiple tools into the machine and do automatic tool changes where we can do unmanned machining overnight if we need to.” Also instrumental to the flexibility of the Correa machine is the milling head, as David states: “The head is a UAD head, and it has two gimbles on there. Each gimble can position to 0.02 degrees and that is 18,000 per gimble. That gives us 324 million positions that it can go through.

    When the head goes to its position, it pulls back and locks into the hirth coupling, so it is solid with over 2.5 tonnes of force locking the head.”

    “The beauty of this is the repeatability. It is better than the synchronous 5-axis machine that we have got because it will repeat to its position. We do a lot of bored holes and true 5-axis holes, and it repeats every time.”

    https://cdn.mtdcnc.global/cnc/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/08120234/Photo-19-04-2021-13-56-29-1-640x360.jpg

    Aero subcontractor flies high with new Correa

    Stockport subcontract manufacturer Manufax Engineering Ltd has just bought its ninth Correa machine from DTS UK Machine Tools in Chorley. MTDCNC travelled to the town on the outskirts of Manchester to find out more.

    Over the last 60 years, Manufax Engineering Ltd has established a reputation for supplying a precision engineering service to the aerospace, nuclear, automotive, space and agricultural industries.

    The company supplies tooling jigs and fixtures to industry OEMs such as Airbus, BAE Systems, Rolls Royce Aero Engines, Rolls Royce Submarines, United Technology Corporation, Bombardier and many more. The offering also encompasses specialist tooling design and manufacture across disciplines such as airframe assembly jigs and fixtures, airframe detail tooling, mould tooling, automotive tooling and components for the nuclear sector.

    Highlighting why the new Axia machine from Correa was acquired, David Baines from Manufax says: “This machine is for us to take on the heavier side of things – large workpieces. We have an 8m capacity on this machine and before this, our next largest capacity machine is 5m. As things keep progressing, we have to meet the needs of our clients and what they ask of us.”

    With such a solid machine construction, Manufax had to build foundations under the machine. Alluding to this, David informs MTDCNC: “There is a huge foundation in here. It is very deep with a lot of concrete in there and it took over three months to put the machine in. With a machine column that moves from left to right, we are not moving heavy parts. We just clamp the parts on the table and away we go, this means there is no restriction on the size and weight of the job we can work with.”

    Looking at the parts the company is machining on its new investment, David says: “We put all types of work through this machine. We have fabrications that come through here, we are also doing a lot of mould tools at the moment for both aerospace and military purposes. One specific job that we have done on the machine is a drill tool for one of our blue-chip customers in the aerospace sector, it started as an aluminium billet that was over 15 inches thick and it has been machined to 1.5 inches and it is contoured. When we were cutting the part on the machine, it was like it was snowing. There was material all over the place and it performed absolutely beautifully.”

    Discussing the ‘box in box’ construction that provides exceptional stability and rigidity, David says: “When we were looking at this new machine, we had a lot of machines that we were considering. We selected this machine because of the ‘box in box’ construction where you have the RAM inside a box which is on the column that is inside in the box. This means that we can take heavy cuts in both directions, and it is not drooping off the column. This is impressive because some RAM machines are only powerful when they are pushing against the column in a single direction. When the RAM is extended the machine also has droop compensation and also wedges that lock into position to enhance rigidity.”

    Looking at the tool change facility and the overall flexibility of the machine, David continues: “We can run this machine unmanned when we have long cutting cycles. We can put multiple tools into the machine and do automatic tool changes where we can do unmanned machining overnight if we need to.” Also instrumental to the flexibility of the Correa machine is the milling head, as David states: “The head is a UAD head, and it has two gimbles on there. Each gimble can position to 0.02 degrees and that is 18,000 per gimble. That gives us 324 million positions that it can go through.

    When the head goes to its position, it pulls back and locks into the hirth coupling, so it is solid with over 2.5 tonnes of force locking the head.”

    “The beauty of this is the repeatability. It is better than the synchronous 5-axis machine that we have got because it will repeat to its position. We do a lot of bored holes and true 5-axis holes, and it repeats every time.”